Colours

 

A colour picker from an Adobe software.

A colour picker from an Adobe software.

A colour picker on a Microsoft software.

A colour picker on a Microsoft software.

A colour bar demonstrating different levels of saturation for the colour blue.

A colour bar demonstrating different levels of saturation for the colour blue.

 

Colour theory research that I did:

Colour Reseach

 

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Using Graphic Design Principals

A special lesson where we had to create a digital design of the person sat next to us using only simple block shapes. Chaos and hilarity ensured but I had a lot of fun creating my peer Dino (who happens to have the surname ‘Peer’. Oof the puns).

person-kandisky style!

Here’s the clean version of my picture. Thought I’ll let people see it first before I dissect it.

Screenshot of golden ratio

I downloaded a golden ratio spiral off the internet, slapped in onto my design and did everything I can to align my shapes with the spiral (the eyes are dead on the end of the spiral). This so called golden ratio (or as I call it super magical alignment spiral) is based off the Fibonacci sequence which incidentally is found in nature and all manner of life. The pattern in a palm tree, the shape of a shell etc all contain this sequence. Hence psychologically people find anything that fits into the golden ratio pattern appeasing (which is why it’s used as a template in logo design). Like every aspect of psychology is all speculative but still useful to know.

Screen Shot 2013-02-15 at 11.45.43

Here’s me trying to make sure my image fit the rule of thirds. The rule of thirds consists of three lines on a page/canvas that divides the page into thrids (a name/jargon that actually makes sense for once). There’s a theory that if the key and interesting aspects of an image is placed in the intersection or along these lines then your picture would look more balanced and natural. Once again this is heralded from psychological research that showed how people subconsciously focus on those areas first.

I've applied gestalt principles:repetition of similar shapes, removing unnecessary close or lines ifso that others can perceive the

I’ve applied some gestalt principles:
repetition of similar shapes; removing unnecessary closure or lines in order to let people envision and complete the shape themselves; putting objects in close proximity allows them to be seen as a group; symmetrical objects is seen as a whole and continuity of shapes (patterns) allows viewers to visualise lines that continues. Can you spot them all?*

*Answers: the white space I left represent the ear and the same non-closure approach was applied to shaping the hair (the triangles are not the actual hair but barriers that convey the shape of Dino’s hair). I used the law of proximity to represent Dino’s side-burns so that people will group the seemingly random black strokes in their minds to form the idea that is all suppose to form something. My Kandinsky influence is all over this illustration so it’s more abstract then most of my work and frankly I like it very much (not least because I got to try something different).

How will I style my article (ideabox)

Now that I’ve become a pretend editor/contributor to Computer Arts, I might as well get a gist of their style and look. This can only mean one thing:¬†mood-board time!

circles and squares are common text frames. A variety of colours are used (black, pink, orange and white are especially prominent). All pictures are presented as a page spread or a rectangular shape neatly lined up (no overlays). Little to no text wraps and everything is laid out in blocks.

circles and squares are common text frames. A variety of colours are used (black, pink, orange and white are especially prominent). All pictures are presented as a page spread or a rectangular shape neatly lined up (no overlays). Little to no text wraps and everything is laid out in blocks. Occasionally the text is made a colour that contrasts the background to further associate content with visuals.